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Return to: 2011 Feature Stories

CLIENT: AMEC

Fall 2011: Woman Engineer

Corporate Profiles: Civil/Structural/Construction Engineering

Jodi Greene has been with AMEC (www.amec.com) a focused supplier of consultancy, engineering, and project-management services to customers worldwide in the oil and gas, minerals and metals, clean energy, environment, and infrastructure markets for three years. With annual revenues of around $5 billion, AMEC designs, delivers, and maintains strategic and complex assets and employs more than 25,000 people in some 40 countries.

Greene is currently a member of AMEC's energy management group where her focus is to complete energy audits, including feasibility of renewable energy projects while reviewing potential projects for Energy Star or LEED certification. Greene has led onsite teams through over 500 facilities in commercial and industrial settings to assess and recommend energy-conservation measures. The assessments include a thorough life-cycle cost analysis reviewing all building systems from HVAC to building envelop.

Before joining AMEC, Greene was at Chelsea Group, Ltd., a building-sciences consulting company where she helped produce a program for energy star certification and LEED-existing building certification reviews for real estate owners and operators. There she also performed numerous indoor air quality (IAQ) assessments at commercial and institutional buildings.

As a young female professional working in building sciences and building energy-management areas Greene often felt she had to prove herself to others. "Five-foot two, blonde females don't often find themselves analyzing giant air-handlers," she declares. "When I finally stopped trying to act like a know-it-all I found those I met willing to teach me things I would never have learned had I not learned to stop talking and start listening."

She adds, "I was lucky enough to have a lot of field experience in commercial and institutional buildings through my first position, so I feel as though that had the biggest impact, but I find myself digging up what I learned in courses such as thermodynamics and economics. Those were two courses I had no idea would be a part of my career."

Greene earned a bachelor's of science degree in mechanical engineering from the University of Wisconsin at Madison. There were five women in her graduating class. "I never thought twice about the fact that there were so few women in the mechanical engineering department," she recalls. "In my mind there was no career that was off-limits to me. That made an impact."

Return to: 2011 Feature Stories